Posted by & filed under Tools For Quicken, Tools for Quicken for Mac 2007.

If you have your transactions downloaded or entered in CSV, TSV, TXT, XLS, XLSX (Excel) format, convert them the QIF to import into Quicken 2014.

Quicken 2014 imports QIF files for all account types. There are some messages that QIF format is discontinued and only Cash account can import QIF, but just tried it yesterday with freshly purchased Quicken Deluxe 2014 download and it imported QIF file created by CSV2QIF at http://www.propersoft.net/csv2qif/ just fine.

So to convert CSV (or Excel or Text) file to QIF, use CSV2QIF at http://www.propersoft.net/csv2qif/

Posted by & filed under Converters, Tools For Quicken.

QIF to PDF in three clicks

To convert QIF to PDF, use QIF2CSV at http://www.propersoft.net/qif2csv/

In QIF2CSV use print button, and then export to PDF.

Another option is to export to CSV and work on the file in Excel and print to PDF from Excel.

QIF2CSV creates spreadsheet for your QIF transactions. QIF2CSV also understands QIF files exported from Quicken including category list and Memorized transactions.

qif2csv_256x256

Posted by & filed under Uncategorized.

Quicken 2014 does not provide import for CSV, TXT, XLS, XLSX (Excel) files. How to import Excel into Quicken 2014? you can easily convert Excel files into one of the following formats and then import converted files.

How to import an Excel file into Quicken

  • Convert to QIF and import
  • Convert to QFX and import

Convert Excel to QIF

CSV2QIF converts CSV to QIF, import Excel into Quicken 2014
Convert Excel to QIF using CSV2QIF. CSV2QIF is capable to create different QIF variants (for Quicken, for MS Money, or for other finance applications), so you need to make sure to select Quicken as the QIF target (Quicken is selected by default when you start the program for the first time).
CSV2QIF supports direct import from Excel (XLS or XLSX) files.

But Quicken 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 does not allow QIF files to be imported under checking, savings, credit card, broker and investment accounts, right? Not exactly. There is different QIF file variations. QIF created for MS Money, or provided for download by your bank are not accepted by Quicken unless you import them under a cash account.

However, CSV2QIF creates QIF files for Quicken, and Quicken does accept these files. In fact all Quicken versions for Windows (up to Quicken 2012) import QIF files just fine under checking, savings, credit card, broker, and investment accounts.

Where is the catch then? The catch is that you need to enter the account name in CSV2QIF exactly as you have it Quicken, otherwise during QIF import, Quicken will try to create a new account with that name. For example, if your checking account in Quicken is called “Checking” or “Bank checking” or other name, you need to enter this name exactly in CSV2QIF (as well as select correct account type) before saving a QIF file.

What is the advantage of using QIF files? Quicken does not require “online call home” during the import. You do not need to have internet connection active and firewall enabled for Quicken to go through to import a QIF file. This can come quite handy when you work and travel and do not have internet always on, but need to complete your finance report on time.

Another advantage? Creating investment transactions becomes quite easy, when you comfortably working in Excel, then copy and paste them in CSV2QIF and import QIF into Quicken.

So when QIF is not good? For Quicken Essentials for Mac. This Quicken variant does not allow QIF files at all. Please see the next paragraph on how to import your CSV into Quicken including Quicken Essentials for Mac.

Convert Excel to QFX (Web Connect)

CSV2QFX converts CSV to QFX (Web Connect)
Convert Excel to QFX (Web Connect) using CSV2QFX. CSV2QFX creates QFX files acceptable by Quicken. CSV2QFX covers bank (checking and savings, credit line and credit card accounts. During QFX import, Quicken ‘calls home’ using internet connection (so please make sure your firewall allows it to go through), and assigns bank details supplied in QFX file with selected account in Quicken. Even more, if Quicken find the match for bank details in the QFX to details with an account, it imports data there automatically. Otherwise, if offers you the import dialog to select existing “unlinked” account, or create new one.

CSV2QIF supports direct import from Excel (XLS or XLSX) files.

QFX format supplies unique id for each transaction, and Quicken uses it to avoid import for the same transaction next time. However, when you prepare your CSV file, it is common you may notice some transactions mistakes, so you need to fix them and import the file again. Even if you deleted the transaction in Quicken, it still refuses to import it the second time.

To deal with your need to import corrected transactions again, CSV2QFX allows to create unique transaction IDs every time you save the QFX file (this option is turned on by default), as well as keep transaction IDs consistent if you need them to be this way.

Posted by & filed under Converters, Tools for Excel, Tools For Quicken.

Import bank transactions into Excel (or convert to CSV and open either in Excel or other spreadsheet software). Online banking sites (as well online credit card sites or investment brokers) provide “accounting downloads” in QIF, OFX, QFX, QBO formats. To open these files in Excel (or convert to CSV), use the converters listed below. Bank2CSV and QIF2CSV converters support extended QIF format to convert data exported from Quicken as QIF format (for transactions, memorized transactions and categories).

Import bank transactions into Excel (convert to CSV).

  • Use Bank2CSV to convert QIF, QBO, OFX, QFX, QBX, OFX, ASO files to CSV format
  • Use QIF2CSV to convert QIF files to CSV format
  • Use OFX2CSV to convert OFX, ASO files to CSV format
  • Use QFX2CSV to convert QFX files to CSV format
  • Use QBO2CSV to convert QBO, QBX files to CSV format

Import transactions directly into Excel without saving to CSV file

  • Select the converter above, install and start it
  • Open your bank statement file
  • Click “Copy to clipboard” button and switch to Excel (start Excel or press CTRL+TAB)
  • Click Edit then Paste to paste your transactions

Convert bank transactions to a PDF file

  • Select the converter above, install and start it
  • Open your bank statement file
  • Click “Print” button and switch to Excel (start Excel or press CTRL+TAB)
  • Click “Export to PDF” (acrobat icon) button

Posted by & filed under Converters, Tools for Excel, Tools for Microsoft Money.

Import into Microsoft Money through QIF or OFX format (all Microsoft Money versions are supported).
There are some differences with QIF and OFX import (see below), but overall either QIF or OFX are fine to use for import.Import into Microsoft Money

Import into MS Money through QIF format.

  • Use CSV2QIF to convert CSV, Excel (XLS, XLSX), TXT to QIF and import  into all Quicken versions
  • Use Bank2QIF to convert OFX, QFX, QBO, QIF, QBX, OFX to QIF
  • Use QBO2QIF to convert QBO to QIF
  • Use FixMyQIF to make QIF file importable (select QIF target as “MS Money or others”)
  • Use OFX2QIF to convert OFX to QIF
  • Use QFX2QIF to convert QFX (Web connect) to QIF

Import into Microsoft Money through OFX format

  • Use CSV2OFX to convert CSV, Excel (XLS, XLSX), TXT to OFX and import into Microsoft Money
  • Use Bank2QFX to convert QFX, QBO, QIF, QBX to OFX (also fix OFX)

What are main differences between QIF and OFX import into Microsoft Money?

  • QIF format supports categories (and subcateogries) and tags, and OFX does not
  • QIF import somewhat better when using “Recover accounts” instead of “Downloaded statements”.
  • OFX format has the reference ID, when QIF does not. Reference ID (when supplied by your bank) allows to skip already imported transactions. ProperSoft converters support reference ID and if not supplied, generate it to be unique to guarantee the import for all transactions.
  • OFX files should be created differently for different software (Microsoft Money for Us, non-US, old Microsoft Money 99, 2000, and also other software like Sage).

Posted by & filed under Converters, Tools for Excel, Tools for QuickBooks.

Import into QuickBooks through QBO format (all QuickBooks versions are supported until they are three years old) or IIF format (all QuickBooks versions are supported). QBO and IIF format are different: QBO (Web Connect) is to import bank transactions, and IIF is more ‘low level’ import allowing to create various transactions between Quickbooks account. Both formats have limitations – read below to choose the most suitable format for you. Import into Quickbooks by ocnverting to QBO or IIF

Import into QuickBooks through QBO format.

 

  • Use CSV2QBO to convert CSV, Excel (XLS, XLSX), TXT to QBO and import  into QuickBooks 2013, 2012, 2011
  • Use OFX2QBO to convert OFX to QBO
  • Use Bank2QBO to convert OFX, QFX, QBO, QIF, QBX, OFX to QBO
  • Use QIF2QBO to convert QIF to QBO

Import into QuickBooks through IIF format

  • Use CSV2IIF to convert CSV, Excel (XLS, XLSX), TXT to QFX and import  into Quicken
  • Use Bank2IIF to convert OFX, QFX, QBO, QIF, QBX, OFX to IIF

What are main differences between QBO and IIF import into QuickBooks?

  • QBO import requires internet connection with Quickbooks allowed to access internet, IIF import is completely offline
  • QBO import allows to apply renaming rules to assign payee or vendor even if it is different on supplied QBO file from the record in Quickbooks, and assign the expense account during import. IIF must have expense accounts supplied as you have them in Quickbooks. CSV2IIF allows to do that through the category column or provide default expense account.
  • Imported QBO transactions go first into the Online Banking Center, where you can review, delete, match and finally include into the register. QuickBooks provides two Online Banking Center modes, completely be their user interface and actually how transactions are imported. IIF import is done directly into QuickBooks transaction register.
  • QBO import requires QuickBooks to be no older than three years. IIF keeps importing without asking you to upgrade.
  • QuickBooks Online imports QBO files only.

 

wpid-wpid-qif-import-successful-under-quicken-2011-2012-03-27-14-54-2012-03-27-14-54.png

Posted by & filed under Converters, Tools For Quicken.

Import into Quicken through QIF format (all Quicken versions are supported) or QFX format (all Quicken versions are supported until they are three years old). There are some differences with QIF and QFX import (see below).

import into quicken converting to QIF or QFX

Import into Quicken through QIF format.

  • Use CSV2QIF to convert CSV, Excel (XLS, XLSX), TXT to QIF and import into all Quicken versions
  • Use OFX2QIF to convert OFX to QIF
  • Use QFX2QIF to convert QFX (Web connect) to QIF
  • Use Bank2QIF to convert OFX, QFX, QBO, QIF, QBX, OFX to QIF
  • Use QBO2QIF to convert QBO to QIF
  • Use FixMyQIF to make QIF file importable

Import into Quicken through QFX format (Quicken versions 2013,2012,2011 are supported)

  • Use CSV2QFX to convert CSV, Excel (XLS, XLSX), TXT to QFX and import into Quicken
  • Use OFX2QFX to convert OFX to QFX
  • Use Bank2QFX to convert OFX, QFX, QBO, QIF, QBX, OFX to QFX

What are main differences between QIF and QFX import into Quicken?

  • QIF format supports categories (and subcateogries) and tags, and QFX does not (Quicken offers the renaming rules feature to assign the category during import
  • QIF formats for Quicken, Microsoft Money and other software are different by their structure. ProperSoft converters allow to create different QIF variants by selecting the QIF target value.
  • QIF import into Quicken is not “officially supported” by Quicken support. Regardless of the support, QIF files import quite well for all account types. Simply follow the instructions provided on the converter help page, and your data will be imported.
  • QFX format creates “online services link” to account ID values provided on the QFX files. Make sure to enter different account IDs when converting QFX files for different accounts.
  • QFX files stop importing once your Quicken version becomes three years old. You have to either buy the upgrade or start using QIF format.
  • Overall, QIF format is somewhat easier to import than QFX (truly based on our experience).
  • QFX format can be imported by Quicken Essentials for Mac
  • QIF format can be imported by Quicken for MAc 2007 (which is support OS X Lion and which the users still using over Quicken Esssentials for Mac).

 

Posted by & filed under Tools for Excel, Tools For Quicken.

CSV2QFX review from Quicken forum:

I used their CVS2QFX converter and it worked for me.  I had to alter the imported data a bit: had to move fields around (payee and memo reversed) and had to drag copy them from a new checking account into my usual checking account but it worked. My bank said that after 90 days you had manually enter the data, and that is simply not true. But the trial version gets you all of 3 transactions, to go straight to the regular version. Their email support was surprisingly fast.

CSV2QFX review: What CSV2QFX does (imports your data into Quicken)

CSV2QFX converts data from CSV to QFX format and helps to import your data into Quicken without manual entry. When your bank is providing only CSV format or you have additional data in Excel, CSV2QFX will help you.

Succesful QFX import into Quicken.

Succesful QFX import into Quicken.

CSV2QFX reads your CSV file columns (the first line) and tries to understand the column content based on the column names. In the most cases, the CSV layout is recognized automatically and no manual mapping requires. Many banks are supported by default.

Some banks and credit card companies provide CSV files without the header. CSV2QFX can read those files and map them correctly for many cases as well (it can find the date column, the amount column, the currency column, the check column, the description column and so on). You can review how the CSV file is mapped and fix the mapping manually if required.

Quicken can QFX files when it is up to three years old. You can still import your CSV data into Quicken, but instead use CSV2QIF converter and import QIF files.

CSV2QFX is available on Windows and Mac. You may also convert files on Mac and import into Quicken on Windows, and convert to QFX on Windows and import into Quicken Essentials for Mac.

qif2csv_256x256

Posted by & filed under Tools for Excel, What is QIF,QFX,etc?.

qif2csv_256x256QIF stands for Quicken Interchange format. Was introduced by Quicken long time as a way to transfer financial data between other software and Quicken, between bank downloads and Quicken, and is still very useful.

The QIF file format is supported by various financial applications (some of them listed below):

  • Quicken itself (all Windows versions up to the latest 2013 and Quicken for Mac 2007 (including lion edition). Quicken stopped “officially” supporting its own invented format in 2005, but it fully supports in the application if QIF files are prepared correctly in “Quicken” flavour. CSV2QIF, Bank2QIF, OFX2QIF, and others all capable of creating fully impotable QIF files for all account types. Quicken also exports files in this format as only option available to get your data out of Quicken (this does not apply to Quicken Essentials for Mac).
  • YNAB (you need a budget) – full throttle personal finance tool. For simpler and more affordable option try Simple Home Budget (support QIF import).
  • iBank (for Mac) – great alternative to Quicken

Why QIF format is so easy and powerful?

  • Simple – this plain text file format easy to create and edit either by software tools or manually by a text editor
  • Covers most user needs to record transactions including split transactions, bank reconciliation, investment transactions, categories and tags. Other financial formats often missed one or more QIF features
  • Structured- QIF describes exactly where data is. Unlike CSV as generic format, either software or user can read and understand the data in the QIF file

What is the difference between QIF, QFX and QXF formats?

  • QIF and QFX are plain text formats (can opened and edited with a text editor), but QXF is an encrypted container
  • QIF supports split transactions, categories, tags, address, when QFX does not have these features
  • QIF is the simplest between these three formats, and the most widely supported

Why does Quicken (Intuit) consider QIF as an outdated format?

This article explains why Quicken moves from QIF to QFX (OFX). However, QIF is still widely supported, including all Quicken versions (for windows, and Quicken for Mac 2007 receintly updated to support OS X Lion).

Another issue is that you cannot use the Quicken Interchange file ‘directly’, even if you can open and see it in the text editor. Use QIF2CSV to convert QIF files to CSV format compatible with Excel and other spreadsheet software.

Since the format was widely used, there are several variations presenting data in different way which can cause incompatibility across different softwa packages or when used in different countries:

  • date formats
  • decimal separators
  • order of attributes to describe transactions

If you are using Quicken right now, you can rely on QIF format as your ability to import your transactions into Quicken. The Quicken Interchange file you are importing has to follow certain rules to make Quicken or other software import it. ProperSoft tools should help you with this task.

Since the format is so simple and feature reach, most likely will be widely used as a move transactional data. Many mobile apps created lately support the format for import, export and exchange.

use Bank2CSV to import QIF files into Excel

Posted by & filed under Tools for Excel, Tools For Quicken, What is QIF,QFX,etc?.

How to start using QIF files? Where is QIF format originated from? Quicken is probably one of, if not, the most popular pieces of financial software in existence today. From its birth via a random meeting between Scott Cook and Tom Proulx Quicken has always been designed for simplicity and ease of use. When Intuit first released Quicken in 1983 there were over forty different pieces of financial software being sold and used all over the world. Quicken with its simple approach allowed for any user to begin recording and handling their transactions in the same manner as using a checkbook.

use Bank2CSV to import QIF files into Excel

How QIF format was created

With the guiding philosophy of simplicity the Quicken Interchange format (QIF) looked for a more robust way of storing and sharing data. Intuit via Quicken designed a file format that used embedded mnemonics is in ASCII format that was readable to any person with a text reader. All transactions were clearly legible and not hidden using some sort of binary cryptography. With this innovative approach to a transaction type database it was easy to see that many other products would spawn from the well documented QIF format.

QIF files and reports

The primary hurdle that needed to be addressed with the QIF format is a way to aggregate all the transactions into reports that were not readily available within the confines of the Quicken software. In order to expand the usefulness of the QIF file two things had to be accomplished. First a translator had to be written that understood the QIF format. Since the documentation of the format is readily available this was a simple task as no reverse engineering was necessary. Second, once the QIF data was translated it had to be presented in another file format that is not only easy to generate but is common across multiple platforms and software offerings. The format that is most used is a Comma Separated Values scheme that is more commonly known as CSV. This file format has been used since the days of punch cards and main frames and continues to be as useful now as it was then. In order to fully understand the transition the following QIF to CSV example is presented for your edification.

QIF Single Transaction:

D08/04/13

T678.42

PWEEKLY PAY CHECK

^

CSV Conversion:

08/04/13,678.42,WEEKLY PAY CHECK

How to start using files in the QIF format?

There are multiple offerings that will convert QIF to CSV but QIF2CSV and BANK2CSV offer a robust and intuitive interface that adds flexibility to the export process from QIF to CSV. These two industry leaders make it easy to bring the QIF file into the twentieth century.

Once converted to the CSV format there are innumerable applications that will import the data and allow for the generation of multiple report types. There are applications that will allow for the simplicity and flexibility of SQL and bring to light ad-hoc queries in a real world environment. There are a myriad of report generators, spread sheets, database applications, and the like that will allow for the import of the CSV format.

In the final analysis there is not one piece of software that can take the data it generates and offer it in every format or reporting fashion that will satisfy all users. It is the creation of a simple and universal data format that allows for the import of the data that brings power to the fingertips of the end user. QIF2CSV and BANK2CSV offer such a service.